Pre-Conference Workshops

Need in-depth training? Attend one of these workshops in conjunction with RIMS ’13. As a bonus, you’ll receive a $100 rebate on the workshop. All workshops take place on April 20-21 in the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Risk Assessment Methods*

Risk assessment lies at the heart of every risk management process. The information generated by risk assessment informs or validates decisions your organization makes.

There are a broad range of risk assessment techniques available for use, and this workshop will describe a broad range of techniques and help you to situate those is use by your organization relation to ISO 31010 Risk Assessment Standard.

This workshop is designed to help you determine the best risk assessment methods suitable for your organization and apply them accordingly within your organization's risk management framework. Note: Given the range of techniques covered, this workshop provides limited in-depth technical guidance. Exercises are designed to help participants apply key and common risk assessment methods.

Harnessing ERM to Tap Risk Appetite*

A clearly articulated risk appetite is the cornerstone of how organizations unleash untapped enterprise value. Incorporating this key concept into your ERM framework can help your organization better manage uncertainty and ultimately succeed.

In this workshop, you will learn how to determine risk appetite and handle emerging risks, with an emphasis on long-term value creation and sustainability.

*A RIMS Fellow Workshop


Risk Knowledge is a searchable library of relevant information for today's risk professionals. Available materials include RIMS Executive Reports, survey findings.

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